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WaterCycle: exploring water through adventure and education.

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The first step in WaterCycle’s plan is to embark on a three pronged learning mission to help us and the public better understand water issues:

  1. An African cycling expedition designed to help us experience water adversity and to learn about privatization and sustainability in a setting that presents some of the world’s most extreme examples of water issues.
  2. A media campaign that will chronicle the expedition, helping the general public learn about water issues with us in an entertaining and accessible way.  The media campaign will require the participation of local communities and individuals, as we will seek to record and understand their water struggles and successes.  We are especially interested in presenting local water initiatives that have been designed with sustainability in mind.
  3. The creation of a water-themed database of educational resources that educators can use to incorporate water issues into everyday learning. Education will enable and mobilize people to make better personal water choices and to pressure corporations and governments at all levels (local, regional and international) to do the same.  We feel that education will be one of the most impactful strategies in making the right to water a worldwide reality.  

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Community Climate Adaptation Plan (CCAP)

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The Strategic Pilot on Adaptation to Climate Change or SPACC organizes the farmers residing within a Hydrological Unit (natural drainage basin) as a group and provides the necessary scientific information and builds the adaptive capacity of the farmer to face the consequences of the drought, collectively. Being part of the Hydrological Unit makes the inhabitants dependent on each other, sharing the common resources.The ultimate goal of SPACC is to evolve “Community Climate Adaptation Plan (CCAP)”, at the HU level. Building the adaptive capacity of the communities in a HU is the over-arching strategy adopted to evolve the CCAP.

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Farmer Managed Groundwater Systems (FMGS)

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Groundwater in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India is tapped through about 2.2 million wells. The state islargely underlain by hard-rocks, where well-yields are low and determined by thickness of the weathered and fractured zones of the country rock. The rainfall and aquifer characteristics vary within short distances. Additionally, the footprint of food (rice cultivation) on water resulted in depletion of groundwater table. The Central Groundwater Board (CGWB) classified 175 (15.5%) mandals (blocks) as Semi-critical, 77 (7%) as Critical and 219 (19.5%) as Over-exploited out of total 1125 (total 47%). The state-sponsored legislations, regulating groundwater use, proved to be very difficult to enforce, simply because the number of wells outnumber the number staff hired by enforcing agencies.

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Farmer Managed Groundwater Systems (FAMGS)

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Groundwater in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India is tapped through about 2.2 million wells. The state is largely underlain by hard-rocks, where well-yields are low and determined by thickness of the weathered and fractured zones of the country rock. The rainfall and aquifer characteristics vary within short distances. Additionally, the footprint of food (rice cultivation) on water resulted in depletion of groundwater table. 47% of the state’s area is currently facing water stress. The Central Groundwater Board (CGWB) classified 175 (15.5%) mandals (blocks) as Semi-critical, 77 (7%) as Critical and 219 (19.5%) as Over-exploited out of total 1125 mandals. The state-sponsored legislations, regulating groundwater use, proved to be very difficult to enforce, simply because the number of wells outnumbered the number staff hired by enforcing agencies.

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Comité de Usuarios del Servicio de Agua Potable de San Juan y Los Pinos

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The San Juan and Los Pinos Water Comitee, was integrated as a need felt by the community. In that time he had only one water supply system for a sector of the population, operating by gravity. In addition, the city of Salama, Guatemala did not pay attention to local supply needs of this sector of the population.

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Community Water Supply and Sanitation: a reachable Solution for Rural Communities

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During the last 15 years Sri Lanka Government with its own funds and with the financial loans and aids of World Bank, ADB and JBIC carried out Community Water Supply and Sanitation projects to supply drinking water and sanitation facilities for rural communities who had otherwise been denied of such. These projects mobilized the communities by making them participate by partly contributing through labour and finance required for the construction stage.

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Sanitation by the community in Denpasar, Indonesia

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The solution uses the community-based management approach through the “Sanitation by the community” program, SANIMAS (Sanitasi oleh Masyarakat). The SANIMAS concept wascreated by Bremen Overseas Research and Development Association (BORDA – network) in collaboration with the “Inter-ministerial Water and Environmental Sanitation Working Group” with the support of the World Bank and AusAID.

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Community Managed Water Supply & Sanitation Scheme

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The Community Managed Water Supply Scheme (CMWSS) is a pilot initiative of UN-HABITAT in support of Asian Development Bank’s (ADB) small piped water network towards facilitating pro-poor governance.  This aims to improve the lives of the urban poor and the disadvantaged by connecting them to safe drinking water, and ensuring users’ comfort and desired level of satisfaction.

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Empowering Rural Communities through Water and Sanitation: the MANTRA Program

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MANTRA is a comprehensive habitat development and governance program, which uses the common concerns for clean water and sanitation to unite and empower rural communities. It has been deployed by Gram Vikas in over 1000 rural communities in the Indian state of Orissa, improving the lives of nearly 300,000 people. MANTRA stands for Movement and Action Network for Transformation of Rural Areas.

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Increasing the resilience of communities to climate change impacts

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South Asia is the home to about 25% of the global population. There is a large proportion of poor people in the region, who are highly dependent on water related livelihoods such as agriculture. Climate change poses many challenges to maintain such livelihoods due to resulting disasters such as floods and droughts. As such, the investment in poverty alleviation would not reap the anticipated benefits, unless a proper adaptation process is in place. 

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