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Progressive pricing

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Water services are not for free. To increase affordability an easy measure is introducing progressive pricing. An example is water services in Belgium. The more you use the more you pay progressively. Large consumers (normally spoken rich people and industries) subsidize small users (normally poor). The current practice is often the other way around: the poor pay relatively more, because they pay per bucket (where there is no connection to public water supply) or large users are subsidized (often industries).

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South Africa’s experience of integrating water access as a Human Right

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Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) set out a short term aim “to provide every person with adequate facilities for health” and “clean safe water supply of 20-30 l/c/day within 200 metres and “an adequate/safe sanitation facility per site”.  In support of the RDP was the 1994 White Paper on Community Water and Sanitation; South African Constitution, (Act 108 of 1996) and the Water Services Act No108 of 1997(WSA). The WSA ensures that everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation”defined “water services” as well as “basic sanitation” and “basic water supply” and further quantified in regulations.

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Disability – turning a Human Right into Human Dignity with Inclusive Sanitation

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This a technical, legal, policy and change management solution to the challenge of integrating disability into sanitation issues. The Dept Water Affairs in South Africa are providing technical solutions that can accommodate the majority of physical needs. Technical solutions are feeding into guidelines and policy development to ensure consistency both for domestic and institutional sanitation. Legal documentation such as the White Paper on Sanitation have also been changed to ensure complete integration for all South Africans as a Human Right requirement. The Water Services Act is also being reviewed and will accommodate this critical issue and will ensure Local Govt include it within the implementation of their role as Water Service Authorities and ultimately responsible for implementation on the ground.

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Making governance work for the poor

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Project was initiated by Freshwater Action Network and WaterAid in response to a UK Government DFID policy paper “Making governance work for the poor” which highlighted the relationship between governance and poverty and outlines a framework for improving governance and created a fund to support the work in 2006. 

FAN members and WaterAid partners were asked to submit local and national level activities to a joint funding bid under the DFID ‘Governance and Transparency Fund’ programme. 

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