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Encouraging the “Proceduralization” of International Water Resources Law

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The ongoing and increasing proceduralization of international water resources law (and of the rules of general international environmental law applicable to transboundary waters) represents significant opportunities for the environmental protection of international watercourses and their dependent aquatic ecosystems.  Procedural rules effectively facilitate the identification, communication and consideration of complex environmental impacts and values and, thus, play a key role in avoiding and resolving disputes, whilst also ensuring that environmental concerns come to the forefront in inter-State engagement.  The recent finding by the ICJ that transboundary EIA is essential for the mandatory requirement of effective prior notification of States  likely to be adversely affected by a proposed project, activity or use of shared waters, and that it is now an established requirement under general customary international law, provides a central procedural mechanism upon which basis the established comprehensive suite of procedural rules can function effectively.  This important development in international water resources law requires to be communicated, promoted and further explored.  

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Green Water Defense in East Asia

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Green Water Defense (GWD) is a balanced and adaptive philosophy and management approach which seeks to integrate natural forces and artificial interventions, and to balance incentive-based and supply-driven measures, with low footprints and externalities in sustainably managing water services and related climate risks (The World Bank, 2011).

  1. Water has to be managed as a precious resource, a service media and a potential risk factor totally in different forms, and in an integrated manner with other natural resources (land, environment), and its users —–Integrated total water management and water cycle management
  2. Water resources management needs to be guided by the principle of ‘live and build with nature’;
  3. Water development and management design should be right-based, productivity focused and oriented towards multiple functions and wins (productive, conservation and risk reduction);
  4. GWD requires a multi-stakeholder participation governance structure, and balanced demand side and supply-driven interventions, to tailor location-specific water management solutions.

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Promoting the “Proceduralization” of International Water Resources Law

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The ongoing and increasing proceduralization of international water resources law (and of the rules of general international environmental law applicable to transboundary waters) represents significant opportunities for the environmental protection of international watercourses and their dependent aquatic ecosystems.  Procedural rules effectively facilitate the identification, communication and consideration of complex environmental impacts and values and, thus, play a key role in avoiding and resolving disputes, whilst also ensuring that environmental concerns come to the forefront in inter-State engagement. This important development in international water resources law requires to be communicated, promoted and further explored.  

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KIM-UNU; Knowledge, Integration and Management Platform developed by the United Nations University and being shared with the World

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KIM-UNU, “Knowledge Integration and Management – United Nations University” is the name of the technology platform developed by UNU-INWEH in partnership with the Centre for Community Mapping (COMAP) The platform is broadly divided into 3 integrated components;

1) A relational database for document, map, photo, video, and spatial information upload combined with a powerful database management system to locate and extract the information;

2) A suite of leaning and communication tools to both facilitate live interaction between users and capture and save imparted knowledge back into the system, and;

3) A user-friendly web portal.

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Increased food production through irrigation improvement and users participation

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Improving the efficiency of irrigation, creating and empowering water-user associations (WUAs,BCWUAs  and DWBs) to help farmers manage water at the branch canal, tertiary and on-farm levels, combined with introducing volumetric water supply, participatory water management and developing an irrigation-advisory service (IAS) initiated/funded by the water ministry but cooperating with the DWBs, BCWUAs and WUAs.

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