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Case study on the West Morava (Serbia, Kosovo), improving the quality a water body in a transboundary context

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The consortium, lead by Safege and comprising Seureca (subsidiary of the Veolia company), Eptisa, Safege Serbia and Beoinzenjering 2000, has the objective to speed up the investments needed for the construction of sanitation infrastructures.
The achievement of this objective is planned through the following means:

  1. the definition of a functional and technical framework in order to facilitate Serbia and Kosovo’s access to European funds of the IPA (Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance)
  2. the definition of two investment programmes (one for Serbia, the other for Kosovo), with implementation intended at the achievement of IWRM within the transboundary basin by 2035

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Eco-Compensation for Watershed Services in the PRC

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Eco-compensation not only shares characteristics with payments for ecological services, but also encompasses fiscal transfer schemes between provincial governments to improve the apportioning of funding for and clarify responsibilities and tasks on environmental management, especially on ecological service flows that cross administrative and regional boundaries, such as watershed ecological services. Such innovations have been at the core of the government’s ongoing efforts to identify and address the underlying institutional drivers of the People’s Republic of China’s (PRC) water crisis. 

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An U.S. Interstate/Federal Commission practicing IWRM for 50 Years

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The purpose of the Delaware River Basin Commission is to manage the water resources of the basin without regard to political boundaries. Even though the Commission has been given a number of authorities through the Compact, there was a need to set direction and priorities. It is also true that no one agency can manage water resources – it takes a team of agencies representing multiple levels of government as well as the private sector, academic institutions and non-profit organizations. That’s why in 2000, we developed a broad stakeholder group, the Watershed Advisory Council, to help the Commission develop a direction setting plan for the next 30 years. The Water Resources Plan for the Delaware River Basin (The Basin Plan), 2004, was developed through a facilitated process with significant stakeholder involvement. The Basin Plan has Guiding Principles and addresses five key result areas (KRAs): 1) sustainable use and supply, 2) waterway corridor management, 3) linking land use and water resource management, 4) institutional coordination and cooperation, and 5) education and involvement for stewardship.  Each KRA has a) desired results, b) goals, c) objectives, d) milestones and e) desired outcomes. We wanted this document to be a driver for action.

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V3 research project of the Volta Basin Development Challenges of the CPWF: Integrated management of small reservoirs for multiple uses.

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The Challenge Program on Water and Food has recently initiated a series of research projects under the umbrella of the Volta Basin Development Challenge that aim at “improving rainwater and small reservoir management to contribute to poverty reduction and improved livelihoods resilience while taking account of downstream and upstream water users including ecosystem services”. In this context, participatory approaches are conducted with local stakeholders in charge of small reservoir management, to characterize and to evaluate the current management rules, and to identify and to discuss with them potential alternatives. This task is central for the CPWF-V3 project focused on “Integrated Management of Small Reservoirs for Multiple Uses” that develops its activities along the Volta basin in Burkina Faso and Ghana.
During the Forum Session, the solution presented will aim at highlighting the many challenges daily encountered by the local stakeholders, expressed through the point of view of a core actor: the Mayor of a rural commune, Madam Asseta Ilboudo, Mayor of Loumbila (Burkina Faso), directly committed to drive and sustain the governance processes around small reservoirs.

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Water Use Master Plan (WUMP) – an approach to participatory and inclusive planning for integrated water resources management

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The Water Use Master Plan is a planning process applying an Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) approach. It is a response to the widely felt need for an instrument for local actors to address water management issues properly. The WUMP process ensures identification of available water resources and water needs at the level of a Village Development Committee (VDC), the lowest administrative unit in Nepal (‘commune’). Moreover, it provides an overview about available and needed water-related infrastructure. This enables planning/prioritizing the use of available water resources (drinking water, irrigation, water for nature and other uses) and serves as a basis for sound investments in the water sector.

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Financing integrated water resources management

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Recently, a clear need was identified to look at ways of generating new revenues which can assure an adequate budget for the Department of Water Resources to undertake IWRM, and thereby secure water supplies for the country. Neither existing budget allocations to DWR, nor the revenues that are currently generated from water tariffs, are sufficient for this.

The Water and Water Resources Law of 1996 mentions “funds for watershed and water resource protection”, based on contributions made by the developers of water resources. A Presidential Decree on Natural Resource Charges is currently under development, with the opportunity to include financing mechanisms for IWRM. Water resource protection fees can provide an important, and much-needed, source of funding for undertake IWRM, especially the implementation of River Basin Plans.

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Adopting the River Basin / Blue-Green Water approach rather than the Watercourse / Blue Water approach

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Direct beneficial use of rainfall is a substantial amount of water (green water), which if properly assessed, could significantly switch the balance of equitable utilization formulas. A proper water resources assessment is an essential step for the equitable utilization of shared water resources as it provides the opportunity for cooperation among riparian countries of a river basin to develop the untapped water resources in the basin rather than compete over already utilized water resources (blue water).

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Enhancing crop production and water use efficiency through balanced nutrient management

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ICRISAT’s mandate is to improve the livelihoods of the poor in the semi-arid crop-livestock production systems through integrated genetic and natural resource management strategies. ICRISAT’s strategic focus in the semi-arid tropics is to attain impact by improving the livelihoods of smallholder farmers and their families through the application of quality science towards developmental goals.

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Ecosystem Approaches in Integrated Water Resources Management (ECO-IWRM)

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This research on IWRM planning and implementation in transboundary case studies demonstrate the successes and challenges in applying such an integrated approach at the international level. The case studies demonstrate that while IWRM planning and implementation is generally stated as a priority at national and transboundary levels, IWRM implementation remains weak and marginalized from mainstream governance and resources.

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Increased capacity building in the field of water resources in Central Asia by Improvement of education process in IWRM.

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The presented solution includes recommendations to improve education quality in water resources in Central Asia. The solution is based on the experience of the Master Program “Integrated Water Resources Management in Central Asia” at the Kazakh-German University Almaty. Water management can therefore be understood not only as a technical task, but must also develop regional governance concepts for optimized control of water use and water distribution.

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