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Révision du code des eaux en Tunisie

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Les évolutions récentes en matière de mobilisation des ressources en eaux ont été à l’origine de  la modification du code des eaux en 2001 (loi n°2001-116 du 26 novembre 2001)  qui a tenu compte de la dimension environnementale, de la sauvegarde des ressources en eau et du  développement des ressources non conventionnelles.Cette modification reste incomplète et mérite une mise à jour et une révision qui tiendront en compte des défis actuels et futurs du secteur de l’eau en vue de concilier l’objectif de sécurité alimentaire, les besoins de développement durable et la préservation des ressources déjà fortement exploitées.

En matière de gouvernance, il convient dans cette optique d’envisager le développement de l’aspect participatif dans la régulation et la gestion de l’eau

Le processus de révision du Code des Eaux a été engagé, avec le lancement d’une démarche d’étude en trois étapes :

  1. diagnostic actualisé de la situation en Tunisie, des textes législatifs et réglementaires existants, et  examen des codes des pays voisins
  2. analyse et propositions d’amendements à inclure dans le nouveau code, mise en forme du projet de nouveau code
  3. Ce projet, dans sa version pré-définitive, doit être prêt vers le premier semestre 2012, pour être soumis pour concertation nationale auprès de tous les acteurs de l’eau du pays. Cette concertation sera conclue par un séminaire d’information et de présentation des résultats de l’étude, au terme de laquelle le nouveau code sera proposé à l’approbation et la promulgation.

 

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Révision du code des eaux en Tunisie

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Les évolutions récentes en matière de mobilisation des ressources en eaux ont été à l’origine de  la modification du code des eaux en 2001 (loi n°2001-116 du 26 novembre 2001)  qui a tenu compte de la dimension environnementale, de la sauvegarde des ressources en eau et du  développement des ressources non conventionnelles.

Cette modification reste incomplète et mérite une mise à jour et une révision qui tiendront en compte des défis actuels et futurs du secteur de l’eau en vue de concilier l’objectif de sécurité alimentaire, les besoins de développement durable et la préservation des ressources déjà fortement exploitées.

En matière de gouvernance, il convient dans cette optique d’envisager le développement de l’aspect participatif dans la régulation et la gestion de l’eau

Le processus de révision du Code des Eaux a été engagé, avec le lancement d’une démarche d’étude en trois étapes :

  1. diagnostic actualisé de la situation en Tunisie, des textes législatifs et réglementaires existants, et  examen des codes des pays voisins
  2. analyse et propositions d’amendements à inclure dans le nouveau code, mise en forme du projet de nouveau code
  3. Ce projet, dans sa version pré-définitive, doit être prêt vers le premier semestre 2012, pour être soumis pour concertation nationale auprès de tous les acteurs de l’eau du pays. Cette concertation sera conclue par un séminaire d’information et de présentation des résultats de l’étude, au terme de laquelle le nouveau code sera proposé à l’approbation et la promulgation.


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Multiple use and benefit sharing around reservoirs with local populations in West Africa

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Overall, five approaches can be considered to address the challenges of equitable and sustainable sharing of benefits with local communities around reservoirs in West Africa.

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Young people in charge of water and sanitation in their communities

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We propose to organize and empower the young people in Rabinal and Cubulco, Baja Verapaz, Guatemala, Central America, in order they can be the supervisors to the municipal and central government to water and sanitation politics, plans, investments and developement projects regarding their communities, providing them tools like basic knowledge on the subject, legal advisory and administrative skills to do it.

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Management of the Río Cahoacán watershed in Chiapas, México, with a focus on conservation and restoration of micro-watersheds to prevent damages caused by high precipitation and floods

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The project focused on local producers as well as land owners. They received help with a strategy to lower their vulnerability and mitigate the negative effects caused by high precipitation and floods. In the same way the project strengthened their adaptation capacity towards climate change and therefore improving their quality of life. The integrated watershed management strategies had been successfully introduced to the most important decision takers and various alliances among institutions lead to a development of processes and actions, mainly the mechanism of paying for environmental services.

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OECD guideline for Multi-Level Governance in Latin America and the Caribbean

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In the 2012 report “Water Governance in Latin American and Caribbean countries: A Multi-level-Approach”, OECD addressed the major co-ordination and capacity-building issues related to the design, regulation and implementation of water policies. It focused on three points: the role and responsibilities of public actors in water policy at central and sub-national levels, the governance challenges related to their interaction at horizontal and vertical levels, and the tools and strategies currently in use to enhance governance in the water sector.

One of the tools developed by OECD is the Multi-level Governance Framework, which provides governments with a reading template to identify main challenges, or “gaps” in water policy as well as possible policy responses. Thus, Seven gaps were categorized, whatever countries’ institutional settings and hydrological features: administrative gap, information gap, policy gap, capacity gap, funding gap, objective gap, and accountability gap

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A City/County Water and Wastewater Study: integrating water, urban planning and stakeholders in Arizona (US)

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The City of Tucson / Pima County “Water and Wastewater Infrastructure, Supply and Planning Study (WISPS)” is a participatory study of water and wastewater infrastructure, supply and planning issues in order to establish the basis for a sustainable water future for the city and the county. The study was a colaborative activity between the two institutions, who invited stakeholders to participate.

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OECD Multilevel Governance Framework:A tool for effective water governance

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In its report “Water governance in OECD Countries – A multi-level approach” OECD addressed the major co-ordination and capacity-building issues related to the design, regulation and implementation of water policies. It focused on three points: the role and responsibilities of public actors in water policy at central and sub-national levels, the governance challenges related to their interaction at horizontal and vertical levels, and the tools and strategies currently in use to enhance governance in the water sector. 

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Multiple Use Water Services (MUS)

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It is widely recognized that systems designed for one single use (either for domestic uses or for irrigation or for livestock) are in practice used for many non-planned uses, which give many livelihood benefits. In response to this reality, a new services approach emerged in the early 2000s: multiple use water services (MUS). MUS takes people’s multiple water needs as starting point of planning and design of infrastructure construction, rehabilitation and governance. MUS is a cost-effective way of generating more health and livelihood benefits than conventional single use approaches.

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Promoting integrity in the water sector worldwide: Water Integrity Network

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The Water Integrity Network (WIN) was formed in 2006 to respond to increasing concerns among water and anti-corruption stakeholders over corruption in the water sector. It combines global advocacy, regional networks and local action, to promote increased transparency and integrity, bringing together partners and members from the public and private sectors, civil society and academia, to drive change that will improve the lives of people who need it most.

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