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The agro-environmental development with an integrated wastewater management

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Globally, food production from irrigation represent > 40% of the total and uses only about 17% of the land area devoted to food production (Fereres and Connor, 2004). Because of irrigated agriculture is the primary user of diverted water globally, reaching a proportion that exceeds 70-80% of the total in the arid and semiarid zones, and water withdrawals for agriculture uses were doubled and those for domestic and industrial uses were quadrupled between 1950 and 1995 (Postel, 1997), are necessary solutions to use in a sustainable way the non-conventional water resources in agriculture, combined with irrigation techniques that help to save water. Secondary salinization from irrigation water is a growing worldwide problem as more agricultural land has become saline (Ghassemi et al., 1995), so is necessary to establish infrastructure of pilot plants for research trials and demonstration projects in a representative Mediterranean semi-arid region with an important intensive agriculture as Murcia in Spain.

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wastewater Reuse Management in Jordan :Applications & amp; Solutions

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WAJ has been contracting with farmers to provide them with reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. In 2009, a total of about 760 ha is irrigated with reclaimed water under contracts with WAJ. It is worth noting that fodder crop irrigation is the dominant application for all other water reuse schemes in Jordan, with a few exception of irrigating trees such as date palm and olive.  In an effort to integrate reclaimed water resources in national water planning, the government of Jordan, with support from the US Agency for International Development (USAID), has been for the past ten years implementing several projects for direct water reuse activities. Wadi Mousa Water Reuse Pilot Project is one of these projects that seek to demonstrate that reclaimed water reuse can be reliable, commercially viable, socially acceptable, environmentally sustainable and safe.

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SWASH+ sustainable sanitation community educational program

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Since January 2009, Sarar Transformación has been providing improved access to safe water and sustainable sanitation to approximately 2000 students and teachers in 17 pre-school, primary and secondary schools in the upper Copalita watershed, Oaxaca, Mexico.  Drawing from its extensive experience with the SARAR participatory education methodology -and the related PHAST approach-, the program involves the entire school community in the assessment process, choice of technical options, and trains students, teachers and parents in the use and maintenanceof the facilities, as well as proper hygiene. Through such training, Sarar-T has introduced and fostered the uptake of alternative dry sanitation facilities, a previously uncommon technology in schools of the region, which conserve water and keep waste out of waterways. 

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