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WaterCycle: exploring water through adventure and education.

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The first step in WaterCycle’s plan is to embark on a three pronged learning mission to help us and the public better understand water issues:

  1. An African cycling expedition designed to help us experience water adversity and to learn about privatization and sustainability in a setting that presents some of the world’s most extreme examples of water issues.
  2. A media campaign that will chronicle the expedition, helping the general public learn about water issues with us in an entertaining and accessible way.  The media campaign will require the participation of local communities and individuals, as we will seek to record and understand their water struggles and successes.  We are especially interested in presenting local water initiatives that have been designed with sustainability in mind.
  3. The creation of a water-themed database of educational resources that educators can use to incorporate water issues into everyday learning. Education will enable and mobilize people to make better personal water choices and to pressure corporations and governments at all levels (local, regional and international) to do the same.  We feel that education will be one of the most impactful strategies in making the right to water a worldwide reality.  

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Empowering Communities to Choose Sustainable WASH Solutions Through an On-line Decision-Support system

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Community choices is a comprehenssive decision making support system that releases trapped knowledge on WASH technologies and solutions to those who most need this information. It acts as a repository of practical information on WASH technologies and solutions, empowers communities, non-experts, local government representatives, NGOs, and seasonal WASH practitioners to select approriate solutions. The system also links communities and practitioners to funding and technical agencies who could help address WASH needs at the community level. The System prototype is web-based, consisting of sanitation and drinking water treatment modules. To use this system, the user answers a set of questions to identify their economic, environmental, cost, cultural and geological conditions. Based on these responses, the user is provided with a list of technologies which are ranked by how well it fits with the user’s solution. The user can select any technology from the list, and is provided with an easy-to-understand technical description  about the technology, benefits and drawbacks, technical implementation iformation, and contacts for local resources and technical support for that technology.

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Endogenous Irrigation Development

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This solution is aimed at upscaling sustainable irrigation development in sub-Saharan Africa. The case of endogenous irrigation development in the White Volta clearly shows that irrigation policies must focus on empowering local farmers to become entrepreneurs.

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SMART Centres providing essential support services for mainstreaming WASH self supply in Africa

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Connect International together with other organizations will introduce ‘SMART Centres’ in 4 to 6 countries in Eastern and Southern Africa. SMART Centres will provide the ‘essential support services’ needed to sustain and mainstream WASH self supply in the involved countries (e.g. advocacy, awareness creation, capacity building, help desk and emergency assistance to/among intermediate target groups, provision of management information software systems, start capital for finance institutes for low cost WASH self supply credits)

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Institutional and Legislative Arrangement for Sustainable Rural Water Supply Systems in Sri Lanka

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The Sri Lankan government established the National Water Supply and Drainage Board (NWSDB) in 1974. The NWSDB has been implementing rural water supply programmes since 1970’s and then with the initiative of the Water Decade, the facilities were expanded. This initiative had given ample opportunities to NWSDB to experiment with various Strategies and Methodologies for implementing RWSS programmes. . The project had already introduced and applied innovative strategies aiming towards sustainable management. Its main feature was bottom to top approach. In this mechanism the following committees were also established:  

·   Village level – Village Coordination Committee (VCC),

·   Divisional level – Divisional Level Coordination Committee (DLCC),

·   Provincial/Regional level – Provincial Coordination Committee (PCC),

·   National level – National Steering Committee (NSC). 

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Provision of back up support towards sustainable community managed rural water supply schemes

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Eight percent of the population in Sri Lanka depends on community managed small scale rural water supply schemes for their day to day water needs. Those schemes have been constructed during a period of three decades with government or donor funding with community participation. They are operated and managed by user community themselves through Community Based Organizations (CBO). However CBOs have faced many challenges in fulfilling this task

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Risk management institution for groundwater resources.

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In the arid and semi-arid areas, the overexploitation of groundwater leads to the continuous drop of groundwater level, which will cause a series of ecological and environmental problems. The groundwater risk management (GRM) for sustainable development can effectively alleviate these problems.

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Making governance work for the poor

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Project was initiated by Freshwater Action Network and WaterAid in response to a UK Government DFID policy paper “Making governance work for the poor” which highlighted the relationship between governance and poverty and outlines a framework for improving governance and created a fund to support the work in 2006. 

FAN members and WaterAid partners were asked to submit local and national level activities to a joint funding bid under the DFID ‘Governance and Transparency Fund’ programme. 

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Low-cost Manual Well Drilling in Ethiopia

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Manual well drilling (MWD) is typically done by teams using manual labor and simple technologies to access shallow ground water. In many countries in Asia, it is a well established business. However, it is a new technology in Ethiopia until introduced by iDE in 2009 with the goal to catalyze wide-spread private-sector, low-cost manual drilling by creating an industry of private well drillers.

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Comité de Usuarios del Servicio de Agua Potable de San Juan y Los Pinos

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The San Juan and Los Pinos Water Comitee, was integrated as a need felt by the community. In that time he had only one water supply system for a sector of the population, operating by gravity. In addition, the city of Salama, Guatemala did not pay attention to local supply needs of this sector of the population.

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